emmablowguns:

The life of a straight boy summed up in two overpriced hats

emmablowguns:

The life of a straight boy summed up in two overpriced hats

100,177 notes

ianto-harkness:

wdw-girl:

ianto-harkness:

When I met Merida in Disney world this Christmas, I was a wreck. I managed to work myself up into an anxiety attack before I even got into the garden. I made it through meeting her and talking to her without crying but as I grabbed my bag to leave I burst into tears, she said “no come back” and gave me a huge hug, here she was telling me to be brave. All I could think about is how I’m not brave and that she wouldn’t even talk to me if she knew what kind of person I really was. I couldn’t say any of that so I just nodded. I came back the next day and several times after during my trip to Disney. Never, in my entire life have I met someone who had such an instant effect on my life. There had been a date in my mind for several months before I met Merida. It was the 19th of January 2014 and that was the day I planned to commit suicide. Miraculously enough, I’m still here. Thanks to Merida’s kindness and her insisting that I am brave, I’m still here. I am rather far off being brave, but I’m alive and that’s what counts.

This and countless other reasons is why Disney is so important to people who are not “children”. Its awful how many times I have heard stories of guests complaining about the about of people who visit the parks who are not there just cause they have kids to take.
 People thrive in fantasy worlds to help them escape the real life hardships. And when we come to the parks, we wanna see special experiences like this, not you and your family screaming at a Cast Member because something didn’t go your way. Every person who passes through a character line or an attraction line is important. Just because you are not under the age of 12 does not mean you don’t love and need a character any less.

I want to thank everyone who sent me kind messages and support, you all mean so much to me.

ianto-harkness:

wdw-girl:

ianto-harkness:

When I met Merida in Disney world this Christmas, I was a wreck. I managed to work myself up into an anxiety attack before I even got into the garden. I made it through meeting her and talking to her without crying but as I grabbed my bag to leave I burst into tears, she said “no come back” and gave me a huge hug, here she was telling me to be brave. All I could think about is how I’m not brave and that she wouldn’t even talk to me if she knew what kind of person I really was. I couldn’t say any of that so I just nodded. I came back the next day and several times after during my trip to Disney. Never, in my entire life have I met someone who had such an instant effect on my life. There had been a date in my mind for several months before I met Merida. It was the 19th of January 2014 and that was the day I planned to commit suicide. Miraculously enough, I’m still here. Thanks to Merida’s kindness and her insisting that I am brave, I’m still here. I am rather far off being brave, but I’m alive and that’s what counts.

This and countless other reasons is why Disney is so important to people who are not “children”. Its awful how many times I have heard stories of guests complaining about the about of people who visit the parks who are not there just cause they have kids to take.

 People thrive in fantasy worlds to help them escape the real life hardships. And when we come to the parks, we wanna see special experiences like this, not you and your family screaming at a Cast Member because something didn’t go your way. Every person who passes through a character line or an attraction line is important. Just because you are not under the age of 12 does not mean you don’t love and need a character any less.

I want to thank everyone who sent me kind messages and support, you all mean so much to me.

45,719 notes

theladybadass:

Josephine Baker in Siren of the Tropics (1927)

3,625 notes

yanclere:

yanclere:

oh tumblr with your superlock and dr. natural and sherwho xD

image

oh boy

image

OH BOY

66,029 notes

Thanks. It has pockets!
every girl ever responding to a compliment on a skirt/dress that has pockets (via nbronten)

(Source: captainmarvel)

318,998 notes

dendroica:

Even Small Medical Advances Can Mean Big Jumps in Bills

Traditionally, insurers lost money by covering people with chronic illnesses, because they often ended up hospitalized with myriad complications as their diseases progressed. Today, the routine care costs of many chronic illnesses eclipse that of acute care because new treatments that keep patients well have become a multibillion-dollar business opportunity for device and drug makers and medical providers.
The high price of new treatments for diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, colitis and other chronic diseases contribute mightily to the United States’ $2.7 trillion annual health care bill.
More than 1.5 million Americans have Type 1 diabetes and cannot survive without frequent insulin doses, so they are utterly dependent on a small number of producers of supplies and drugs, which have great leeway to set prices. (Patients with the far more common Type 2 diabetes — linked to obesity — still produce insulin and can improve with lifestyle changes and weight loss, or on oral medicines.)
That captive audience of Type 1 diabetics has spawned lines of high-priced gadgets and disposable accouterments, borrowing business models from technology companies like Apple: Each pump and monitor requires the separate purchase of an array of items that are often brand and model specific.
A steady stream of new models and updates often offer dubious improvement: colored pumps; talking, bilingual meters; sensors reporting minute-by-minute sugar readouts. Ms. Hayley’s new pump will cost $7,350 (she will pay $2,500 under the terms of her insurance). But she will also need to pay her part for supplies, including $100 monitor probes that must be replaced every week, disposable tubing that she must change every three days and 10 or so test strips every day.
That does not even include insulin, which has been produced with genetic engineering and protected by patents, so that a medicine that cost a few dollars when Ms. Hayley was a child now often sells for more than $200 a vial, meaning some patients must pay more than $4,000 a year. Other refinements have benefited a minority of patients but raised prices for all. There are no generics in the United States.

(via NYTimes.com)


Fun fact:  Those disposable sensors were $50 a pop when I was using them and only lasted for a matter of days before you needed a new one.  They were unreliable and the needle was massive to boot.  That’s not even counting the transmitter that has (had?) a life expectancy of a year or two.  And I don’t have to pay for my doctor’s visits etc., so if you’re in the US you can add that in there too.

dendroica:

Even Small Medical Advances Can Mean Big Jumps in Bills

Traditionally, insurers lost money by covering people with chronic illnesses, because they often ended up hospitalized with myriad complications as their diseases progressed. Today, the routine care costs of many chronic illnesses eclipse that of acute care because new treatments that keep patients well have become a multibillion-dollar business opportunity for device and drug makers and medical providers.

The high price of new treatments for diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, colitis and other chronic diseases contribute mightily to the United States’ $2.7 trillion annual health care bill.

More than 1.5 million Americans have Type 1 diabetes and cannot survive without frequent insulin doses, so they are utterly dependent on a small number of producers of supplies and drugs, which have great leeway to set prices. (Patients with the far more common Type 2 diabetes — linked to obesity — still produce insulin and can improve with lifestyle changes and weight loss, or on oral medicines.)

That captive audience of Type 1 diabetics has spawned lines of high-priced gadgets and disposable accouterments, borrowing business models from technology companies like Apple: Each pump and monitor requires the separate purchase of an array of items that are often brand and model specific.

A steady stream of new models and updates often offer dubious improvement: colored pumps; talking, bilingual meters; sensors reporting minute-by-minute sugar readouts. Ms. Hayley’s new pump will cost $7,350 (she will pay $2,500 under the terms of her insurance). But she will also need to pay her part for supplies, including $100 monitor probes that must be replaced every week, disposable tubing that she must change every three days and 10 or so test strips every day.

That does not even include insulin, which has been produced with genetic engineering and protected by patents, so that a medicine that cost a few dollars when Ms. Hayley was a child now often sells for more than $200 a vial, meaning some patients must pay more than $4,000 a year. Other refinements have benefited a minority of patients but raised prices for all. There are no generics in the United States.

(via NYTimes.com)

Fun fact: Those disposable sensors were $50 a pop when I was using them and only lasted for a matter of days before you needed a new one. They were unreliable and the needle was massive to boot. That’s not even counting the transmitter that has (had?) a life expectancy of a year or two. And I don’t have to pay for my doctor’s visits etc., so if you’re in the US you can add that in there too.

59 notes

captainfelman:

It’s a bummer that you can’t put “can take dick like a champ” or “sucks dick like a pornstar” on your resumè

5 notes

wolffromupnorth:

Is this a panic attack or is my blood sugar just low

Is my blood sugar low or am I just too hot

Is my blood sugar low or am I just hungry

The adventures of a diabetic

is my blood sugar low or is this actually making zero sense?

Is my blood sugar low or is everyone in this room really freaking annoying?

57 notes

fuckyeah-nerdery:

vaterorlag:

bamonbrigade1:

silvermoon424:

togifs:

Confused Little Girl Meets Her Father’s Twin For the First Time

CAN YOU EVEN IMAGINE HOW MUCH OF A MINDFUCK THAT WOULD BE TO A BABY THO

She sitting there like “my life has been a lie.”

If you’re dad
And HE’S dad…
WHO’S FLYING THE PLANE

"…Wait a goddamn minute here…"

fuckyeah-nerdery:

vaterorlag:

bamonbrigade1:

silvermoon424:

togifs:

Confused Little Girl Meets Her Father’s Twin For the First Time

CAN YOU EVEN IMAGINE HOW MUCH OF A MINDFUCK THAT WOULD BE TO A BABY THO

She sitting there like “my life has been a lie.”

If you’re dad

And HE’S dad…

WHO’S FLYING THE PLANE

"…Wait a goddamn minute here…"

339,850 notes

charlesoberonn:

juilanne:

y’all=you all

w’all=we all

i’m gonna make it happen

don’t = do not

3,161 notes

I met my wife at a Star Trek convention. She was study abroad from France and spoke little English, and I didn’t know a lick of French. So, for the first few months of our relationship, we communicated by speaking Klingon.

Hear more tales of nerdery in this week’s Pwn Up! (via dorkly)

Okay I’m not even a Star Trek fan but that’s beautiful.

(via tchy)

82,948 notes